Primary Resources

Primary Resources

Australia’s Magna Carta Institute Rule of Law Education supports national and state curriculum requirements in Primary education.

Curriculum links and program ideas

Civics, Citizenship and Laws

Magna Carta

Australian Colonies

Democracy and Australian Governance

Primary Posters

Democracy and Government

A democracy works best when it is supported by the rule of law. Democratic values determine how governance is managed, where ruling power is decided by the people, for the people. The rule of law ensures, those in power are subject to the law and those laws are known and followed. Thereby providing protection from anarchy, lawlessness, and corruption.

In January 1901, all six Australian colonies joined to become one nation. This began the process by which the legislatures that had grown up in the colonies since 1788 became state legislatures operating as part of one system, which included the new federal parliament. These bodies combined state and federal laws that now define the Commonwealth of Australia.

The Westminster system has travelled a long and arduous road to become the blueprint for Australian governance. In this section, teachers will find resources that explain the important details of how this system works, such as how a law is passed in the Parliament and the separation of powers, a vital part of how the Australian judiciary system operates today. Protecting Australians’ right to due process of law is an important safeguard of personal liberty defined under the Australian Constitution. Without this system of checks and balances, Australians would face uncertainty in living under the law.

  Downloads

Democracy and Government

A democracy works best when it is supported by the rule of law. Democratic values determine how governance is managed, where ruling power is decided by the people, for the people. The rule of law ensures, those in power are subject to the law and those laws are known and followed. Thereby providing protection from anarchy, lawlessness, and corruption.

In January 1901, all six Australian colonies joined to become one nation. This began the process by which the legislatures that had grown up in the colonies since 1788 became state legislatures operating as part of one system, which included the new federal parliament. These bodies combined state and federal laws that now define the Commonwealth of Australia.

The Westminster system has travelled a long and arduous road to become the blueprint for Australian governance. In this section, teachers will find resources that explain the important details of how this system works, such as how a law is passed in the Parliament and the separation of powers, a vital part of how the Australian judiciary system operates today. Protecting Australians’ right to due process of law is an important safeguard of personal liberty defined under the Australian Constitution. Without this system of checks and balances, Australians would face uncertainty in living under the law.

   Resources

The Fundamental Concepts of Democracy
Timeline to Democracy

  Downloads

Democracy
Democracy in Action
The Fundamental Concepts of Democracy
Timeline to Democracy
Universal Declaration of Human Rights
A State of Chaos
Anarchy
Australia becoming a nation – Change in Australian Society
Australia becoming a nation – Federation
Australia becoming a nation – Immigration
Australia becoming a nation – Suffrage
Australia becoming a nation – System of Government
The Australian Constitution
Separation of Powers
Separation of Powers – Check and Balances
The Australian Judiciary
Bills and Laws
Australian Levels of Government
Timeline Towards Federation
Estabishing Australia’s First Legal System